Celiac, Irritable Bowel Syndrome, and Crohn's Array

The Celiac, IBS, and Crohn’s Array (CICA) evaluates your genetic risk for celiac disease, serum markers associated with active celiac disease process, and genetic serum markers associated with Crohn’s disease all through a simple blood draw.

The CICA is designed to provide an accurate evaluation of GI tract function by gathering information from various pathways.

Optionally, it can be combined with the Alcat Test to evaluate innate immune cell responses to as many as 400 other foods (including gluten, gliadin, casein, and whey) and substances for the most comprehensive assessment.

GI issue prevalence in the United States

CICA Test Sample

In the United States, an estimated 60-70 million people are affected by gastrointestinal disorders (GI). Celiac disease may be present despite the absence of GI symptoms, particularly, in relatives of individuals with celiac disease.1

  • In the U.S., 2 in 5 Americans are affected by GI disorders
  • Up to 20% of adults in North America suffer from irritable bowel syndrome (IBS)2
  • Approximately 0.44% of Americans experience Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis3
  • Up to 1% of the general population have symptoms of celiac disease4
  • 15% of the general population in western countries suffer from indigestion and constipation5, 6

Not surprisingly, there is overlap between these disorders.

Who may benefit

  • Those with gastrointestinal symptoms and autoimmune disorders that might suggest a problem with gluten
  • Those with increased intestinal permeability which has been linked to autoimmune disorders and other conditions
  • Those suspected to have Crohn’s or celiac disease
  • Those suffering from symptoms of IBS including diarrhea, bloating or cramping
  • Those with chronic fatigue
  • Those with malabsorption of nutrients and/or nutrient deficiency
  • Those with unexplained symptoms such as unintended weight loss or skin rash
  • Those seeking increased health efficiency or high-performance lifestyle

 

Testing Options & Test Results

Option 1: Celiac, IBS, and Crohn’s Array (CICA)
(Genetic + Serologic)

Option 2: CICA – Genetic Only 

Option 3: CICA – Serologic/Antibody Only

CICA test results are color-coded and easy to read. Each result is thoroughly explained with expert commentary.

 

Pricing & Contents

CICA Full Array- $650.00 (when combined with any Alcat Test food panel $430.00)

  • GENETIC: HLA typing for celiac disease: HLA-DQ2.5 and HLA-DQ8; Genetic markers for Crohn’s: ATG16L1 and NOD2
  • ANTIBODY: TotalSerumIgA,tTG(IgAandIgG),DGP(IgAandIgG)&Anti-Saccharomycescerevisiaeantibody(ASCA)

CICA Genetic Only- $310.00

  • HLA typing for celiac disease: HLA-DQ2.5 and HLA-DQ8
  • Genetic markers for Crohn’s: ATG16L1 and NOD2

CICA Serologic/ Antibody Only- $310.00

  • Total Serum IgA, tTG(IgAandIgG), DGP(IgAandIgG) & Anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae antibody(ASCA)

 

For information on having your test kit mailed to you, email info@pronutritionconsulting.com

 

 

Sources

1 Aggarwal S, Lebwohl B, Green PHR. Screening for celiac disease in average-risk and high-risk populations. Therap Adv Gastroenterol. 2012 Jan; 5(1): 37–47.

2 Hulisz D. The Burden of Illness of Irritable Bowel Syndrome: Current Challenges and Hope for the Future. J Manag Care Pharm. 2004;10(4):299-309

3 Loftus EV Jr. Clinical epidemiology of inflammatory bowel disease: Incidence, prevalence, and environmental influences. Gastroenterology. 2004 May;126(6):1504-17.

4 Gasbarrini GB, Mangiola F. Wheat-related disorders: A broad spectrum of ‘evolving’ diseases. United European Gastroenterol J. Aug 2014; 2(4): 254–262.

5 Saad RJ, Chey WD. Review article: current and emerging therapies for functional dyspepsia. Aliment Pharmacol Ther. 2006; 24, 475–492

6 Brandt LJ, Chey WD, Foxx-Orenstein AE, et al. Evidence-based position statement on the management of irritable bowel syndrome in North America. American College of Gastroenterology Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders Task Force. Am J Gastroenterol. 2009;104(Suppl 1):S1-S35.